Navy Photos
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Civil War Navy.
Back then in the early Navy, kids served along with adults
Kid is probably in the Navy Of The Northern Republic.  Or to put it another way.  He's a Yankee!
Civil War Navy.
Back then in the early Navy, kids served along with adults
Kid is probably in the Navy Of The Northern Republic.  Or to put it another way.  He's a Yankee!
Civil War Navy.
Back then in the early Navy, kids served along with adults
Kid is probably in the Navy Of The Northern Republic.  Or to put it another way.  He's a Yankee!
Civil War Hispanics
On the Seas

Some of the most dramatic fighting of the
Civil War occurred on the high seas where
Hispanics served with valor in the navies of both
sides.
Two Hispanic Union sailors earned Medals
of Honor for their actions in battle.  Philip Bazaar
was a seaman on board U.S.S. Santiago de Cuba
in 1865.  He was one of six men from the fleet to
enter the enemy works during the assault on Fort
Fisher, North Carolina.  He carried dispatches during
the battle while under heavy fire from the
Confederates, and for these actions, Seaman
Bazaar was awarded the Medal of Honor.  John
Ortega enlisted in Pennsylvania and served as a
seaman on U.S.S. Saratoga.  Conspicuous gallantry
in two actions gained Ortega the Medal of Honor
and a promotion to acting master’s mate.

Colonel Santos Benavides

Originally from Laredo, Texas, ultimately became the highest-ranking Mexican American in the Confederate Army.  As the commander of the 33rd Cavalry, he drove Union forces back from Brownsville, Texas in March 1864. 

David G. Farragut

But the Civil War's best-known Hispanic was the American naval officer, David G. Farragut (1801-1870), the son of a Spaniard.  In 1862, Farragut successfully commanded Union forces at the capture of New Orleans.  While commanding Federal naval forces during the Battle at Mobile Bay in Alabama, Farragut uttered the famous slogan: "Damn the torpedoes.  Full steam ahead." During the Civil War, President Lincoln established the Medal of Honor as the highest and most prestigious military award given for valor.  The medal is presented to any soldier or sailor, who "distinguishes himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty."  Two Hispanic Americans received the Medal of Honor for actions during the Civil War.